Princess Mako attended a ceremony to commemorate Emperor Hirohito

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

Princess Mako attended a ceremony to commemorate Emperor Hirohito at Emperor Showa's (Hirohito's) mausoleum at Musashi Imperial Graveyard in Hachioji, Tokyo. Other Imperial family members attended memorial ceremonies at the Imperial Palace.

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

Hirohito was the 124th emperor of Japan who reigned as the emperor of the Empire of Japan from 25 December 1926 until 2 May 1947 and of the state of Japan from 3 May 1947 until his death on 7 January 1989. He was succeeded by his fifth child and eldest son, Akihito. The Shōwa era or Modern Showa refers to the period of Japanese history corresponding to the reign of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito) from December 25, 1926 until his death on January 7, 1989. Hirohito was the longest-reigning monarch in Japan’s history.

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

Empress Masako and Princess Aiko, Crown Prince Fumihito and Crown Princess Kiko, and their daughters Princess Mako and Princess Kako

12 Comments

  1. The fitted silhouette of the top and especially the long skirt that seems to flare out at the back like a bustle looks very Victorian.
    - Anon 9:13

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    1. Exactly what I thought. Very Victorian. I like it.
      Is that her sisiter with her?

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  2. Por favor , es horrible. Que pena que esta gente joven se tenga que vestir así. No tiene nada que ver con la juventud japonesa. Si al menos fuera un entierro..

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    1. @ Carla. They dress like this to respect their culture. Their traditions are very profound.

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  3. I must agree with Carla. The younger generation is not given any say in how they appear in public. These are very carefully brought up royals with a very strong sense of duty. I am sure they could be trusted to make some more modern choices and still look very appropriate. Their work would not suffer in the least. This coat is quite a lot for someone so young. The hat, as we have discussed in the past, is terrible. I think black gloves would have looked so much better. I like the way they honor their elders and their history. It is an excellent example for all.

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    1. I agree and Japan is so progressive in design. In this way they are not a good ambassador for modern Japan.

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  4. Pues la gente joven de Japón respeta la cultura como todo el mundo hasta cierto punto. Hace años la realeza se vestía con kimonos que eran muy incómodos , cambiaron a esto de ahora que es la moda de los años sesenta, no tiene que ver con la cultura . Sólo tratan de diferenciarse de la plebe. Se puede vestir bien como lo ha hecho la anterior emperatriz sin ser tan pacata.

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    1. Fair point about the kimonos being the traditional dress originally. I think it is still a cultural approach - Japanese royal public occasions deliberately minimise individuality (both men and women) except by the subtlest of details. They wear a 'uniform' as expected by the public. I read your comment using Google translate and it seemed to link Princess Mako with the previous empress. This is young princess Mako not current Empress Masako. Elle.

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  5. May prosperity of the Japanese Imperial Family continue to reign

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  6. Jolies silhouettes pour toutes les deux, chacune dans son style ; je préfère quand même le boutonnage de la princesse Kako !

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  7. I somehow like the coat dress. It has a very old fashioned feel, yes, but given the solemn occasion it somehow works for me. What doesn't work, and would change the entire look for the better is the hat and gloves. The bowler style hat doesn't fit the look. A smaller style hat perhaps? And white gloves, nope.
    Chel

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  8. I think Japanese royals are such a wonderful example of how to achieve a great balance between respectful traditional attire and the desire to‘keep up with the times’. Unfortunately I don’t feel educated (or even informed) enough to opine on this particular sartorial choice (is it aligned with traditional Japanese? is it somewhat of a departure?) but either way, I personally like it!


    Lily A

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