Japanese Imperial family attended 'Rikkoshi Senmei no gi' ceremony at the Imperial Palace

Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito proclaimed his younger brother as crown prince to the people of Japan and the world at the "Rikkoshi Senmei no gi" ceremony held at the Matsu no Ma stateroom of the Imperial Palace. The ceremony was attended by about 50 people, including Imperial Family members and government leaders.
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
During the rite, attendees other than Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Crown Prince Akishino, Crown Princess Kiko and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga wore face masks. Afterwards, at the “Houou-no-Ma” room, the Emperor gave Crown Prince Akishino the “Tsubokirigyoken” sword.
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
After the event, the Crown Prince and Crown Princess worshipped at the three sanctuaries of the palace. In the Matsu-no-Ma room starting, the Crown Prince met with Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako in the “Choken-no-Gi” rite.
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
The ceremonies, together referred to as "Rikkoshi no rei," followed the styles of the 1991 "Rittaishi no rei" rites in which the current emperor was proclaimed crown prince and celebrated his new status with guests.
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Emperor Naruhito, Empress Masako, Princesses Mako, Kako, Akiko, Yoko, Takamako, Tsuguko, Hanako, Tomohito, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko
Back: Princess Akiko, Princess Yoko of Mikasa, Princess Takamako and Princess Tsuguko. Middle: Prince Hitachi, Princess Hanako and Princess Tomohito of Mikasa. Front: Princess Mako and Princess Kako of Akishino.

16 Comments

  1. I am in awe of the exquisite fabrics, needlework, and tailoring of the royal families' ceremonial clothes, and the headdresses are amazing. Of the others, most are dressed as expected in superbly tailored gowns of pretty colors, but few stand out. Princess Takamako is one of the exceptions. She wears the customary pearls but adds a pendant and foregoes a brooch. Her olive green gown and hat are embellished with lace . She always catches my eye. I believe that is her daughter, Princess Tsuguko, dressed is a plum gown, which is also out of the ordinary. I also appreciate the hatless lady in the back row surprisingly dressed in black. Might she be an attendant of Prince Hitachi? All in all, a treat for the eyes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm in awe also. Who couldn't be?

      Delete
    2. Your comments are spot on. Such a feast for the eyes. These ceremonies with the traditional dress are so beautiful.
      Chel

      Delete
    3. Indeed, so much culture! They should make a documentary of Masako's make-over (hair and make-up and clothing) for these traditional events. There must be so much history behind it. Also, the way all the women stand there with something in their hands, does anyone know what it is they hold and why they stand there like that? I would love to see a documentary on this, does anyone know one?

      Delete
  2. i love traditional Japanese clothing. but how is the Empress and Crown Princess walking with their feet covered in fabric!

    W

    ReplyDelete
  3. Toutes élégantes dans leurs toilettes mais j'aime particulièrement celle de la princesse Tamako de couleur kaki dont le bustier à petit col Officier est délicatement brodé ; une dame que j'ai toujours vue bien vêtue ; superbe son collier de perles avec un pendentif original... Délicieuse princesse Kako dans sa tenue "Lie de vin" ; je préfère à celle de sa sœur la princesse Mako !

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oh my gosh, they all look so magnificent, I’m swooning...and as always I’m impressed by how youthful-looking Empress Masako is for a woman in her fifties. And both she and Princess Kiko are so beautiful here, serene and smiling.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow I'll have the Crown Prince's robe--fabulous colour, followed by the beautiful creation his wife is wearing. My favourite dress is the wine/red of Princess Kako

    ReplyDelete
  6. From Joann: What a treat for the eyes - the fabrics, the designs - they all look wonderful. I wish the Western culture could learn a little from the Japanese. I am so weary of the provocative clothing women wear today, plus the overall thrown-together look. Don't anyone yell at me. That's just my opinion. And I know I'm behind the times fashion-wise. (But I do love tradition.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Joann. I think we could take a thing or two from Japanese culture, including from the fashion arena.
      And don't worry about being behind the times fashion-wise Joann.
      Nobody's perfect, you know.

      Delete
    2. @8:23pm - I agree with your every word! ~Laurel~

      Delete
  7. Stunning traditional clothes, but also certainly very warm and heavy with their many layers. And I guess it takes time to dress in those creations and to have the hair done in traditional style.
    -B.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember reading that for the recent enthronement ceremony, Empress Masako needed 3 ladies in waiting to help her to walk just a couple of steps forward because her ceremonial kimono with all the layers and undergarments was so extremely heavy and restricting.
      However I completely agree that the colours, fabrics and embroidery are just stunning. Real artistry and craftsmanship to create these beautiful traditional garments that have such a long history behind their style and custom.
      - Anon 9:13

      Delete
  8. Situations and ceremonies like this is why I come to this page (not the petty comments - and you know who you are). The fabrics/textiles are sooooo exquisite and a treat to see. I just wish there was a way to touch them. As a seamstress I would love to "feel the hand" of these fabrics and study the needlework.

    Europa

    ReplyDelete
  9. The Imperial ladies are carrying a ceremonial fan , which they carry on all religious or state occasion's. This can be known by two names either gosho uchiwa , a bamboo fan covered in a fine washi paper , or hi-ougi , a fan made of Japanese Cypress .

    ReplyDelete
  10. Japan events are always very dignified. I know that the fabrics are high quality and well sewn. But: I guess I have a different opinion than the other discussants. The cuts of the clothes are boring for me. Still the same, the same cuts of the dress, never changing. As if development stopped here. Boring.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post