The Duchess of Sussex gave a speech at Girl Up 2020 Leadership Summit

Meghan Markle wore Adam Lippes Pintucked silk crepe de chine top. The Duchess of Sussex wore a new silk crepe top by Adam Lippes
The Duchess of Sussex gave a keynote speech at the 2020 GirlUp Leadership Summit which was held online for global girls' leaders. Girl Up is an association operating in 120 countries and seeking to unite young female leaders asking for equality in wages, rights and living standards.
Meghan Markle wore Adam Lippes Pintucked silk crepe de chine top. The Duchess of Sussex wore a new silk crepe top by Adam Lippes
Launched by the United Nations Foundation in 2010, the campaign aims to achieve gender equality worldwide, providing girls with the resources and platforms they require to start a movement for social change — no matter their background. (The Duchess of Sussex wore a new silk crepe top by Adam Lippes.)
The Duchess of Sussex gave a speech at Girl Up 2020 Leadership Summit

Meghan Markle wore ADAM LIPPES Pintucked silk crepe de chine top
ADAM LIPPES Pintucked silk crepe de chine top

105 Comments

  1. Hair looks terrible.

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  2. This looks like Cher in the sixties, hippy style.

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    1. For most people video images are never flattering.
      When I see myself on video, I want to run away and hide. I can never believe it's me.
      Love the blue top. Looks like one could wear it back or front.

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    2. She did a great job, well done Duchess Meghan - keep going your way. H

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  3. Très joli haut dans cette couleur Bleu roi mais pas fan des cheveux que je trouve trop longs et lissés ; elle nous a habitués à beaucoup mieux !

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  4. Love the colour of the top and great to see her participating I a cause that matters to her.

    I prefer her hair a bit shorter and wavier.

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  5. She looks like these mannequins they put hair on.

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  6. Elle fait un peu pocahontas là

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  7. Her make- up is pretty and I like the color of her top.
    E. B.B.

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  8. Probably time for a good haircut.

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  9. To many hair extensions

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    1. Lovely colour top. She has a really good taste: less is more and in general hardly any prints, which I like. But this hair!! Every month she gets more hair. I think Indeed (too) many extensions. I wonder what her natural hair is at the moment. When she was young she had all these wonderful curls. I like Meghan. Even when she was not so well known she did a lot of good work

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  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Really? Where?

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    2. Think so too.
      A totally different person.

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    3. Anon 4:53 perhaps you could answer my question then? Where has she had liposuction? I'm not a plastic surgeon and I know it can occasionally be done on the neck but is more usual on stomach, hips and buttocks. As I don't think the Duchess had a fat neck and we cannot see anything below her shoulders I'm curious as to where this procedure has happened.

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  11. Pretty blue top but bad long hair.

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  12. Nice to see her in colour.

    I wish her speeches were less Victim-hood and more of empowering, offering solutions to problems.

    Jill.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  13. Firstly, let's get the hair out of the way. In California, places like hair and nail salons have been closed for months. There were a few weeks that some were able to reopen, but they are shut down again. Look how long it took Catherine to have her hair cut and colored and the restrictions are not nearly as severe in the UK. Letizia still hasn't had hers cut and colored. Before making the negative comments about Meghan's hair just to be mean, consider the situation. That being said, I would like to see Meghan have some length taken off.

    This color blue looks very nice on her. We have seen her wear it before. The top has a cut that is very comfortable in the warm weather. It is difficult to comment more without seeing how she has styled it.

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    1. With due respect, it’s not the length of the hair that is not flattering, but the way she wears it, IMO too much in her face.
      How about a ponytail, a bun, or hair behind your ears, and, when your hair is thàt long, if you wish, you can handle a pair of scissors yourself!

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  14. She needs to balance her speeches with positive input. She must always remember that her audience comes from diverse backgrounds and some parents may not be too keen on her how she views life generally.

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    1. Exactly! thank you very much. I know she wants to do well but her speeches are of an american view. The commonwealth and the world is more diverse than that. She mentioned the 'digital generation' billions of these girls don't even use the internet, that's a western view of the world

      miss W

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    2. I'm afraid that's the point, Anon 7:24. She's encouraging the younger generation to take charge of the debate, not listen to their elders. I really don't think she's interested in what the parents think at all. Calling young people to "forcefully" (her word) push for change - when they have still so little experience and so little wisdom - is reckless. It's not their fault they don't yet have wisdom and experience. It's just a function of their age. But that reality cannot be ignored. Yes, the young have important contributions to make, but mostly, this time of their life should be dedicated to preparing for the future, not trying to control the present. I don't care how articulate she sounds; the message is dreadful. She actually called for them to "rebuild" (again, her word) the world. You cannot rebuild something until the former thing is taken down. Don't be fooled by the veneer of royalty: This is Marxist rhetoric. The destruction in the streets we see today is a direct result of young people being fed a steady diet of this rot for decades.
      The blue is beautiful, but I'm having trouble caring about that.

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  15. beautiful color that flatters her very much, I do like the very straight hair, although I agree that perhaps a little shorter would be more attractive.
    She is such an eloquent speaker, well done Meghan!!

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    1. My thoughts exactly. She looks and sounds good. - Siri

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    2. I agree with you Cherry Blossom! Judy

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  16. Oh my goodness.....the hair! Can it look even more unnatural? Frieda

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  17. Great cause and speech - well done by the Duchess. Love the blue top (nice colour), but not the Rapunzel-Style.
    The challenges are huge - all the best for the coming time for everybody.

    Hannah

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  18. Love the blue top. It looks very good on her. Not a fan of the massive extensions. They are too long and look heavy. I tried to listen to her speech, she is indeed an eloquent speaker, but I could not understand what it is all about. Girl empowerment - well, being a teacher and a mother for many years, I can say that girls in the western world have access to all forms of education and can choose between career and motherhood like never in the history of mankind before. There are still some inequities, girls who grow up in a financially less fortunate surrounding, will have it a bit tougher. But overall the paths are cleared. Which is not the case in all places in the world. Nowadays it is more often the boys who fall out of the system and fail a school career. I get it, she want s to have some impact on the world, change the world for better and empower people, especially girls and women, but I can't help, her words sound like social justice warrior gibberish, this has not much to do with real people lives and real people problems.

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    1. Sorry Beth you clearly don't understand social justice and it's insulting you call it gibberish when it's not happening to you. Women are still looked upon as second class citizens not only in other parts of the world but the US too. We still don't have equal pay, government trying to tell us what to do with our bodies when men can have their viagra covered by health insurance. You're also incorrect. Not all girls or women have access to education and have a clear path in the US. Absolutely false. If that were true everyone would have an education and not live in poverty. This is real live issues for people oh and not being murdered. The DoS is bringing awareness to the BS going on in America and using her platform to do so. I don't see many royals doing it. Awesome to try to tear her down for making a stance against wrongdoing. She looks amazing. - Tessa

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    2. Same in Europe. Look a Germany where the main party (people's party) still don't want 50% women as representitives in parlament or 80% of the well paid jobs have men aso. Well paid women can buy themselves free of babysitting or housekeeping but still play the second violin and not a duet.

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    3. Well said Beth. The US colleges and universities have more women than men enrolled. High school drop outs are overwhelmingly more male than female. Same as teen drug addiction- much more overwhelmingly male. The hoops they jump through to stay women make less ignore individual life choices either outside of work which impact salary or the fact that women are less likely to pursue a raise. Thankfully there has been much given to support young women but young males are being ignored and left behind in American. Women in the US have not only equality but in have much support and opportunities.
      Glo

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    4. Well spotted Beth! Some people like to hear themselves talk. Frieda

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    5. Beth,
      Thank you for injecting a bit of sanity into the discussion. My only quibble with your remark would be calling her words "gibberish". I'm sorry to say it's much more dangerous than that. She is an SJW, and she's actively seeking recruits. I'm just sorry her message is connected to the British Royal Family. And I'm sorry that the younger generations in GB and the US are not being informed about the truth of their countries' true contributions to the world.

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  19. OMG! The conspiracy theorists have invaded this blog. She looks like a different person? Perhaps she has had her weekly face transplant. Sometimes I wonder about the sanity of some people.
    CB

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    1. Anonymous 8.43 Wow,you are just an evil person.Shame on you.

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  20. That fake hair is awful. However, the blue top is a flattering color on her.
    Chel

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  21. She's looks beautiful! Love how a royal is taking a stance....especially for Girl Up. We need it now more than ever. - Capt. Marvel

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  22. I love the blue colour of her outfit, a bright splash of colour, suits her perfectly.

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  23. Looks like???.

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  24. Honestly, even as a grown woman, this speech and her address to her high school resonate with me. I find them inspiring, especially during these turbulent and daunting times.

    Unrelated but I wish the camera was positioned a bit closer and the lighting was better. But alas, it's hard to make exceptional quality recordings when you're at home.

    Fashion related, her hair looks healthy. Though I have to agree that at this length it's a bit heavy for her face. To be fair I haven't had a haircut either since the closures began. I'm sure she tried her best to style it. It looks super sleek.

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  25. @ Beth, with all due respect to state that her words are gibberish is at a minimum astounding, I don't have any doubts that you are talking about your personal experience, and perhaps maybe you live in a country where women have equality and opportunity to be everything they can be, but that is not the case everywhere.
    My country is as rich as it gets, and yet social inequality is specially pervasive for women, and since taking care of women is my job and vocation I can attest to that fact. I am a very fortunate person, my private practice affords me financial stability, but I don't live in a bubble, I also work pro bono in various clinics in the city, and I won't even mention the countries where my military reservist status has taken me.
    In the US, the gender wage gap is at 81.1%- Women don't enjoy paid maternity leave, the majority have to use sick leave, vacation and unpaid leave in order to spend a few days with their newborns- lots of them have to choose career versus family,it's a myth that they can choose to stay home, the percentage of couples that can live on one salary in this country is minimal- Employers can choose not to pay for birth control based on religious beliefs-Our military continues to turn a blind eye for sexually abused/harassed women.
    I won't get into the stories that I have encountered about abuse.
    So, no, it's not gibberish.
    PS, just to clarify, this is not a rant about men ( I also have a beloved son, who is being taught to respect women) is just a sad reality. Some of us will take action by donating time or money, others will make speeches to bring attention to the issues, others will protests for change, and others will pretend that everything is peachy king.

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    1. Cherry Blossom, although this is not a political, filosophical , etc blog, I feel the need to answer on your exposure.
      I’m from an European country and knew things are not good in the US, but thís bad I didn’t know.
      How can such a country be a world leader is beyond me, must be economics.
      In Holland men and women are equal for at least half a century, it is not an item anymore.

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  26. Anon-12:17 PM-
    Women’s conditions are NOT that bad in the US, it is largely taking anecdotal cases and blowing them way out of proportion. The largest provider of abortion and birth control, Planned Parenthood, receive $530 million from the federal government (more Title X money than anyone else while only serving 40% of Title X recipients) as well as being a BILLION dollar company and women can get birth control there. Depending on a woman’s insurance policy the pill may or may not be covered. Comparing it to viagra (which is heavily regulated in amount and dosage by insurance coverage) is ridiculous as one is to treat a disease/malfunction of the body while the other is to prevent a healthy experience (excluding the desire to get pregnant). The exception is if there is a health concern. My dear friend had much uterine scar tissue after c-sections which another pregnancy would likely end in a ruptured uterus so her insurance covers it. Viagra is like insulin whereas women’s contraception is like condoms- which are not covered.
    I don’t disagree Holland offers more government provision with its smaller population, large socialized medical health system and less overall military expenses than the US. However with a 38-50% income tax rate and a VAT of 6-21% on top of that (which most Americans do not want) I am not surprised.
    Glo

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    1. Gol, Thank you for your clear explanation!

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    2. Glo,
      You are quite contrary in many of your posts. I don't want to waste my time sparring with you. You do need to be corrected on one point, however. Viagra is not only used "to treat a disease/malfunction of the body". It is very naïve to think that Viagra is not abused. It is used as a party drug, taken by young men before they ever go out in the evening. Cocktailed with other drugs, for their supposed enhanced or imagined effects, there can be very real, very dangerous interactions. We haven't even touched on the health concerns of men that take Viagra or an equivalent, such heart health. Doctors must evaluate and monitor the patient. Viagra is abused and most certainly should be regulated. Buying and taking it illegally could be the unnecessary an cause of death.

      An issue from another perspetive is female contraception. You say contraception is to "prevent a healthy experience", therefore your reasoning for declaring "women’s conditions are NOT that bad in the US". My own personal experience was not "healthy", and there was no consideration taken by the insurance company for the consequences of their actions. Years ago, I had a waiver on my insurance that denied prenatal care, and also denied any form of birth control. Due to past medical history, I was considered to have a preexisting condition, one that all but guaranteed giving birth to a premature, disabled baby. While not being willing to cover a pregnancy or anything to prevent a pregnancy, they would have to cover a premature baby with multiple disabilities if I got pregnant. How does that make sense? It doesn't. And your simple argument is just that, too simple. While you do acknowledge the exception of a health concern, there is still more to it than it being "ridiculous as one [Viagra] is to treat a disease/malfunction of the body while the other [birth control] is to prevent a healthy experience". Not everyone should have children. I have great respect for people that can admit they would not make good parents, for whatever reason. Sometimes, one or two children are all that can be afforded and still give the children the life you want them to have. No one, no government agency, no private agency, should be able to tell a woman she must continue to have children for any reason, because birth control is not covered. Don't bring Planned Parenthood into it, please. No woman should be forced to go to Planned Parenthood, no matter how near or far from her home, when she should be able to walk into a pharmacy and pick up a prescription--just like a man picks up his Viagra. We pay for insurance and it should actually insure us for things that matter. If men were the ones getting pregnant and having to care for the babies and children, birth control never would have been an issue.

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    3. Anon 4:15- We were discussing government funding and insurance coverage for Viagra and women’s contraception. Drug abuse of substances is different from dosage and regulation- just look at the opioid epidemic. Yes all medications come with side effects even the pill. Not naive, just focused, unless you are trying to say insurance companies and/or the federal government knowingly supply Viagra for those abusive purposes- which I would be interested in seeing evidence of and would definitely be against.
      Regarding your specific experience with pregnancy, not sure when that waiver was in place but it is very unusual for an insurance company, especially after Obamacare passed. It could be either the type of plan or type of medication- wanting a name brand over generic. However in your comment, even you agree there was a place (you mentioned PP, while they are the largest, they are not the only one) you could freely go (not forced) for free contraception but you would not choose that.
      Where in any place in the US are women forced to have children- no where, what an absolutely absurd statement you make. It is a choice women in every state can make, even in cases of rape, women can choose to not have children with no one legally able to stop them. Lastly even the pill, as with most BC, is not a 100% preventative measure. Only abstinence or sterilization are the two guarantees of never having children and neither one in the US can be forced on people. However one is free and the other is again usually covered by insurance. Many people pay for things in their insurance they don’t have covered while other things they want are not covered. That is often the case in employer/group coverage, it’s not a gender issue. Sadly Obamacare completely did away with that type of individual insurance packaging- so now people who don’t even use maternity insurance (by far one of the most expensive costs) have to carry it. I agree that part of it is unfair.

      Hi mr last comment- what you have shown but don’t agree with is the power and choice US women have in all of these things.
      Glo

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  27. Nice top. Like the colour. Just can't get the link from an actress with a degree in Theatre to girls and women in economy. But this has nothing to do with MM as a person. Most of these so called figureheads and well paid speaker aren't qualified for what they are talking about. Scarlett Witch

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    1. She double majored in theater AND international studies. By your judgement is Prince William unfit because is a former helicopter pilot who majored in geography? Or maybe the Duchess of Cambridge shouldn't speak either as a former accessories buyer who majored in art history?

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  28. My name is Joann. I don't want to post as Anonymous, but something has changed on this board and it won't let me post the way I used to. Anyway, I want to make a couple of comments. Firstly, royals, by tradition, are not supposed to be involving themselves in political or public policy. Their education/experience is irrelevant to their royal duties of representing the Queen. They may care about causes/issues, but they are limited due to monarchical traditions/protocols as to how they can express them.
    On another subject, I am weary about hearing how bad things are in the U.S. if things are that bad, why are so many people willing to leave their homes/cultures, etc. to come here?
    On another subject, I am also saddened that more women do not support other women - particularly those in low-paying jobs. The focus seems to be on helping women climb the ladder to better pay and more lofty job titles. But other women are taking care of their kids while they do that and are working in dead-end jobs with no pay advancements. Many child care workers work for minimum wage; they have no vacation days with pay, no sick days with pay. And if there are snow days and kids are home, the workers stay at home, but get no pay. Other women work in beauty salons with low pay as well. The girl who does my hair works for a chain salon. If a customer complains about the style she was given, she (the stylist) has to give her a new style, but she doesn't get paid for that. Successful women frequent these salons and avail themselves of this perk without a glance backward at their sisters who toil in those unjust conditions. I myself witnessed a woman arriving at the salon with her daughter. She demanded a redo for her daugbter because the daughter after getting home, decided she didn't like the cut or style after all. The woman was pushy and arrogant. The owner assigned a stylist to accommodate her and the stylist was not paid for the redo. I was there. I saw it all.
    In my opinion, this idea of sisterhood is one big myth. Women do not always look out after other women. And in my career, the two worst jobs I ever endured was at the hands of women supervisors. I have seen them undercut other women to advance their own careers. Many climb the ladder to success, but never turn around and look down at the women who helped get them there.

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  29. @ Glo, once again you use this forum as a platform for your political agenda, my post wasn't about Planned Parenthood, which BTW has been defunded to a point that in some states women have to travel hundreds of miles in order to get a birth control script or a referral for a mammogram, but that wasn't the object of the debate. Since you are bringing women's health into the mix, and because generally is a good indicator of social progress, I can say that I am qualified to speak about that very subject with facts, not political demagoguery . Maternal mortality in the US has more than doubled from 10.3 per 100,000 in 1991 to 23.8 in 2014. American women have the greatest risk of dying compared to 11 high income countries. Black mothers are 3 or 4 times more likely to die during childbirth, just at the same rate than Mexico and Uzbekistan . This happens mostly because of lack of health insurance, poverty and institutional discrimination.
    We are light years away from many European countries regarding social benefits for mothers and families. I don't talk the talk, I walk the walk every day of my life,
    I still remember your posts about COVID 19 stating that it wasn't so bad according to some of your relatives in the field of medicine, and that sunshine and walks were the best therapy, at the same time I was seeing people die alone in agony, I was holding the hands of patients trying to explain to them that they were going on a ventilator, putting their loved ones on speaker phones so they could say their goodbyes while I could see the terror in their eyes. Later on we have discharged survivors with horrific side effects, scarred lungs, dialysis, amputations , neurological disorders and with the fear of what the future holds for them. So please stop giving your "objective" opinions.
    Sorry, if I come across a little abrupt, but these aren't political opinions, but a simple reality
    I am done.

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    1. Actually Cherry I have been responding here for quite some time about fashion and have responded when I felt I could contribute to the discussion when not about fashion. If the moderator is ok with me being part of social or political discussions/comments that you (for example) have felt you could post to, why should I be censored because you don’t like what I have to say? Especially when I try to include facts not personal attacks? While I truly appreciate your service to COVID patients, I can also point out that 80 % of the dead in my county were in nursing homes due to our governor’s horrible policy of forcing them to take COVID positive patients. Our dear healthy older friend who lived in one died while his wife, after 2 months, still fights for her life. You have once again truly mischaracterized my COVID statements, which were mainly regarding medical supplies, ventilators, and false media stories about no places for the sick - which were true given Javitz and the USNS Comfort were largely unused by the NY Gov and Mayor. You’ve also just mischaracterized my response to you- people can easily read for themselves. You used access to contraception as an example of women being treated poorly in US society and I disagreed giving a specific example with actual facts- that taxpayer money, in an annual amount (2018), is given towards women’s preventative health measures. PP were not defunded, it was reported they refused federal money in 2019 because of objections against abortion legislation, per the NYTimes, about referrals. However they actually received increased federal funds $617 million at that time (as of Jan 2020). Your stat about maternal deaths among AA women is troubling but incomplete. Sadly the US maternal mortality rate has indeed gone up for all ethnicities, with the most being due to the 7-70% increase in c-sections. Race is not the only factor that goes into that number- are there other issues? For example AA women are more likely to have hypertension. In the pregnancy mortality rates in AA women the 3 biggest reasons were due to cardiomyopathy, other cardio related diseases and other diseases, while in Caucasian women twice as many deaths were due to infection. Is age a factor- yes most deaths occur in those over 30 and 3x more for those over 40. Did they have a regular MD or medical care which misdiagnosed those conditions or didn’t they seek regular medical care? Where is it happening? Major cities are an issue. In Philadelphia a horrible abortion dr killed many, leading to laws requiring abortion clinics to have admitting privileges to hospitals in case of emergencies- those laws have recently been thrown out by the US Supreme Court for infringing on the right to an abortion due to distance- so the choice is a distant safer clinic with hospital admitting or a closer unsafe one- the choice was made to offer women a closer, less safe one (largely cheered by groups who say they support women!). AA women have a much higher abortion rate. Is it because they are without insurance and have no regular OB for example? Does a hospital show differing treatment to patients based on race since
      Native American and Alaskan Native American women are also more likely to not have live births than Caucasian or Hispanic women?
      Glo

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  30. Hi Anna, yes, this is what I think. There are so many really well educated people out there who studied and graduated in there area and expertise. But they often are never heard because nobody invites them as speakers. You don't have to be an expert to become a figurehead. You have to be rich and in the right position. That's all. You are an actress? Want to talk about what everyone has to do to make the world better? Yes, no problem. No qualifications needed. Especially not in the topic you are talking about. And for the rest of us? We are the cattle that is expected to look up at those lighthouses of wisdom. And follow them on Twitter and Instagram to make them even more powerful because they are viewed as influencer. Scarlett Witch

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    1. @10:46. It is easy to complain about influencers etc. who are 'made' by today's social media, but like Cherry B. you too con do your part. Volunteer to help children at after school programs with their homework, to read and understand what they are reading (the library is usually a good place to start), to teach immigrant and other women how to express themselves on paper for formal writing, how to complete official forms, to write resumes...practical things that they can use. If every one stays silent or is cowed into silence no one is helped.
      As Joann points out, too many women see their success as strictly a personal achievement, (forgetting all the other women who fought for women's rights) and treat their less fortunate sisters with little respect.
      Meghan comes across as an effective public speaker, and her degree bears some relevance to the work she wants to do. While we concentrate on the US, Girl UP! seems to have an international reach where the fate of women and girls can be quite grim for some. July

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  31. Poor women, whatever she says or do, is always wrong. I cannot judge if she is totally responsible of the actual situation, but I am sure that she was not briefed enough before stepping into the UK and facing the local trash media business. No-one could handle all the hate that was put on her. I wish her to find peace and harmony again in her life as it seemed to be before marrying the firm. Best wishes to her and Harry.

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  32. Oh my! If I could borrow the words from Rodney King at the LA rights . "WHY CAN'T WE ALL JUST GET ALONG!!!

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  33. Finally able to create an account...
    @Joann, I feel compelled to respond to your post. Yes, Royals aren’t supposed to be political, but the speech given by MM is not partisan, is just about female empowering, and if given by any other member it would probably be applauded. Your statement about “ conditions in the US” is a false equivalent , the commentators above were comparing industrialized, rich countries. You are aware that there aren’t Germans, Norwegians, British, or French people being put in cages at our border. Our immigrants come from the most impoverished, crueles countries in the world, so, yes we are better off than Central American, African, and some Asian countries, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t social inequity here, and there is a lot to be improved.
    We distribute 28 millions of free meals daily in ours schools for children that won’t have anything to eat otherwise, there are almost 30 million people without health insurance, there is no paid maternity leave, there is no free education for children younger than 5/6 , thus putting families on very dire situations, most Americans have less than one month in savings should they lose their jobs, these are just some examples. You can choose to be aware or you can be like Glo, rationalizing these inequities and arguing with the people on the trenches, please don’t be a Glo.
    Yes, lots of women don’t support their own, some comments here are proof of that, so let’s stop the attacks. We may not agree with some of the points made by MM, but the vitriol and nastiness is uncalled for.
    Let’s start now!!
    Regards

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    1. Sandra why are you so afraid of specific facts, isn’t that where the solutions are found? Sweeping generalities offer no help, especially if rooted in talking points and misinformation. In speaking about the US maternal mortality rate my thought is improvement would be to look for ways to decrease the level of all deaths, especially in populations with higher numbers like AA women. To simply look at the stat and say it’s systemic racism in the healthcare industry does what exactly? Launches crowds of “protestors” to throw bricks and burn ambulances and hospitals, labeling all health care workers as racist murderers to be spat at and attacked like the police? Is that really going to help or will it lead to even more suffering and death overall but especially in minority communities as it has with the police issue. Then to throw tons of money at the situation with no accountability to make sure it gets to those who need it? However looking into what the leading causes which are in the death numbers - cardiomyopathy, heart related diseases, hypertension that is a specific way to show how those deaths can be lessened. Screen AA girls and women for cardiac issues - (some are pre-pregnancy conditions), is it part of the pregnancy protocol for AA women especially? We’ve been able to lower sickle-cell mortality significantly that way. Cherry is a nurse, she says she works at a clinic to help low income minorities, does her clinic screen for these? An EKG is one tool to if this. Both federal and private money and effort has been spent to look into this for solutions - $45 million over 5 years from just the CDC to local “MMRC’s” (Maternal Mortality Review Committees) to pursue, identify and create solutions. A systemically sexist or racist nation would not put that kind of $ and effort into this.
      Glo

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    2. Appreciated your thoughts Glo, because if it was just a result of systemic racism then how do they explain the lowest US Maternal Mortality rate is in Hispanic women. Just like Asian Americans score best on standardized tests. The trick many use is to selectively edit info to pit black against white and blame racism while ignoring other issues. Serena Williams had heart conditions after her pregnancy, not low income, in bad health or lacking insurance or time off.

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    3. Thanks Anon 5:40. Good point because they separated non-Hispanic “black” women for the AA numbers and there are a number of “black” Hispanic women. Also the rate was there from different income brackets and education levels. Hispanic women and AA women have very similar socio-economic trends but their maternal mortality rates are very different. The only differences were Hispanic women had less education, slightly (not much) higher income, and more were single mothers. It’s amazing how people can look at the same info and find different conclusions, especially if they are zealous for a narrative or public figure. A lot of articles have been written lately looking at this info and saying it’s systemic racism with very little said about other factors offering little help and really stretching to draw some of those conclusions.
      Heart disease in women is big in my family. My maternal grandmother died of her 3rd heart attack at what I think is the young age of 64- her first was in her 40’s. This was at a time when many, even medical professionals, considered men at higher risk of heart attacks with warning signs and risks for men being highlighted for all. That was until people really looked into it. Then a big push was for women and things like Go Red for Women and identifying how risks/symptoms are different for women which have helped. My mother, her daughter, has cardiomyopathy, she doesn’t know if she had it before or after her 2 pregnancies- they used to tell women diagnosed with it prior to pregnancy that they couldn’t have children. My mother has also been dealing with CHF (Congestive Heart Failure) for years after her breast cancer (which also runs big in our family-both Aunts had it too) radiation and chemotherapy treatments in the 90’s damaged her heart muscle. It was something medical professionals, pointed out by her current very skilled and respected cardiologist said, did not take into account in the 90’s. She has so far outlived her mother by over 10 years. We grew up very poor and some health professional coming and saying to me because you are poor or you are a woman or you are a certain race and because our country is horrible to you, you can expect to die does nothing to help. In fact in most cases it truly hurts, especially when the data they point to is so inconclusive to draw that conclusion- much more harm than good is done. Someone comes and says you are more at risk for this condition or that which can lead to death, these are ways to help lower this risk - that is helpful and gives me the opportunity to actually DO something. My mother (a high school graduate who studied nursing and was an EMT) did more to help me know about focusing on things I could control or look for. So many women are completely unaware of cardiac issues during and after pregnancy. It was my mom - not the OB - who spoke to me (through 4 pregnancies) specifically about heart health in pregnancy. While they do check attentively for hypertension, no OB or PA or nurse went through info regarding cardiac considerations during pregnancy. I recall no info or literature or posters drawing attention to it. It was the same with my friends from various ethnicities and none of us had an EKG or the other one is it ECG(?) even though a few of us would be considered higher risk due to genetics or ethnicity. Sorry this is so long and not fashion. Love the site and thanks to the moderator:).
      Glo

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  34. From Joann to Sandra - I have read your comments with interest. . I submit that this country offers a great deal . Or course there are inequities. But there are people of goodwill all over the country working to correct those imbalances.
    Our communities are enriched by people from other countries and cultures. But many immigrants are not downtrodden. They are doctors, nurses, university professors, artists, musicians,yet , they still choose to come to the U.S. They were trained in their home countries.
    I grew up in an immigrant culture. My father came from Yugoslavia. My mother's family came from there. And my father's family also. He was brought here to work in the coal mines. He was 12 when he started work in the mines. My mother and her sister had to leave school in the sixth grade (my mother) and her sister, (the fifth.) Why? Because their mother was incensed that they were discriminated at school and were forced to lie on the wooden school floor until they admitted to have taken something that was stolen. They didn't steal it, of course, .So my grandmother pulled them out of school. They never went back.
    But not once growing up - not once - did I ever hear my father or mother say one critical thing about America. My father was grateful to be an American. He never took his citizenship for granted. And we were taught that growing up.
    We also never heard our parents speak Serbian in the house. My father wanted us to learn English. He wanted us to be Americans. And he wanted us to be educated. Three of us in the family went on to college.
    I never knew this story until after my parents died. I always wondered why my mother left school so young, but I never could get an answer. After her death, her sister told me. I also leaned other things about their hardships, but for some reason they kept their feelings from us. My father, especially, was a proud American. And so am I.
    Many people in this country have suffered some sort of discrimination or injustice. Because my grandfather couldn't read or speak English, he was taken advantage of by someone regarding a land sale.
    I learned as a young child about injustice. We lived in a small coal mining village. It was all white. I was never around people of color. There was a black family who attempted to move into our village to a vacant farm to settle down. People in the village were against it. Who stood up for that black family? My .father. I was a small child, but I remember vividly standing against our old fashion kitchen sink, the rest of the family nearby. My father stood in the middle of the room and he said to all of us, "Them people have a right to be here." For some reason this story and that whole controversy has stayed with my brothers and sisters and me..
    From that experience, I learned that societal changes take place in people's hearts - from person to person - from one small village at a time. People have to live it and see it. For real change to be understood, it has to hit home.

    Those of us who choose to live here, should never forget how much suffering has been endured to make this country what it is. regardless of how much work there is yet to be done. It is pointless to slam one person's truth against another's. Real truth always finds its own path to the surface.




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  35. From Joann to Sandra. I am puzzled as to why Meghan's speech was brought up. I never referenced it in my post. I didn't consider it political, but I do think that is the path she is moving towards. I was referring to the comments about the different education or experiences royals were supposed to have. In my view that was irrelevant because royals had, by tradition, one duty and that was to represent the Queen.
    I don't think Duchess Meghan needs any defense from me. In fact, I am not aware that I was ever hateful towards her. If you like, then I will share my thoughts. I believe Meghan has enormous potential. If I would venture a criticism I would say it has to do with her lack of experience with the "gutter" press and her inability to put them in their proper perspective.
    I believe she is wrong to assume the public was paying any attention to what they were writing. All one has to do is look at the crowds that turned out for the wedding. Meghan was wrapped in love and goodwill that day. The public loved her.
    She should have put more trust in the people and ignored the nonsense around her. She had the intelligence and the determination to do it. Why she didn't, is a mystery to me. The press has a short attention span and tends to focus on the flavor of the month. They would have lost interest in her.
    Apart from the tabloids, I also feel the job of a royal may not have been fulfilling enough for her American experiences.
    As Americans we love to "speak out," "make our voices heard," and that simply
    is not compatible with what is expected of a junior royal. I don't think she fully
    appreciated that she is married to the sixth in line to the throne and is a British princess, not an American activist.
    In time, I predict, Meghan will reconcile those two aspects of her character. And, in time, she and Harry will return to Britain. They know their son should be raised in the British royal tradition. And that simply cannot happen in Los Angeles.

    Time heals all wounds, as the saying goes. And the monarchy may change also. In the future,there may be more scope for her abilities and she and Harry also will have evolved with the times. They will soon find out there is no such thing as a free lunch. People will use them. No great fortune will fall into their laps unless they agree to write tell-all books or give speeches about what the Queen is really like.
    I don't think Meghan and Harry will agree to that. I think they will find that is a bridge too far. They still have to think of their son's future. When Charles becomes king, Archie most likely will get a title and royal rank. And I don't think Harry - or Meghan - will separate their son from his royal birth.
    If Meghan doesn't return to acting, they will return to Britain. sooner rather than later.

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  36. I would call these speeches from the conference "word diarrhea". Vague bullshit from millionaires from a multi-million hacienda. No specific solution.
    My second cousins from the USA were visiting us. They did not want to believe that everyone in our country has health insurance, that every woman has 2 years of maternity leave with a state contribution and a guaranteed right to return to a job position, that a minimum of people have a gun at home.
    Dear Cherry Blosom and others - you should solve this things, not abstract bullshit from privileged people.

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    1. Dear Anonymous @ 10:54, I would agree with you about certain celebrities and their cheap talk, however I also know that many of these public/ rich personalities come in different shapes, some of them come from humble backgrounds and they do pay it forward. I often rely on donations and fundraising from groups and individuals and I don't want to delve on their motivations, but every penny they raise is put to good use in our free clinics. Sometimes their self gratification is our gain. :-)
      Best Regards.

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  37. Good Lord Glo, stop your rhetorical nonsense, stop you inflammatory discourse. Why would you equate social conscience with people attacking other people? What’s wrong with you? Get off your hyper political horse and let people debate without your awful comments.
    To anon 8:51, I don’t see either one of the people you mention say anything derogatory about the US, much to the contrary, they are stating facts and trying to better the lives of many people that may not be as fortunate as you, that is how you make your country a better place, by being objective, un partisan and generous with your time and money.
    My motto is , love for country ALWAYS, love for their citizens ALWAYS, praise to Government ONLY WHEN IS DESERVED.

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    1. Anon 11:08- not hyper political just responding actually. You confuse my examples of government government with my sentiments for people/society and I provided a realistic example given what has been playing out across the US for over a month. Perhaps more dialogue on specifics is exactly what is needed - why do people say there are problems and we need change want to shut it down?
      Glo

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    2. Please stop answering to GLO, all she wants is to talk about her political views, don’t give her the pulpit.

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    3. Anon @ 12:45 Agree, just a pundit for the her party. And she has the nerve to talk about the ACA!!!

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  38. Glo. This will be my last response to you. Firstly I think you should stop schooling the professionals with your googled statistics, are you giving me advice as how to treat pregnancy? Your audacity is only surpassed by your inexperience on the subject. Maybe is hard to believe, but yes I have been k own to administer EKG's to pregnant mothers, even to the poor ones, but thanks for the suggestion....
    I can tell you what else we do, treat diabetes, obesity, give inmunizaciones ( we treat children as well) treat for internal parasites, infections, Pap smears, hypertension, skin disorders.. and so much more... what are you doing ?
    Secondly, to even insinuate that people talking about social issues could be associated with police killers, and criminals is just devious.
    Thirdly, my contribution to this country makes me proud, I have served in Irak and Afganistán, under very different administrations. and I continue to work in refugee camps in Jordan, so is laughable that you are here in your patriotic high horse... what have you done?
    You use this forum for your own political agenda, but fortunately some of us aren't like you.
    Have a good day, and please refrain from answering me in the future, I have no interest in your opinion.

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  39. From Joann: Like most Americans I would love to see health care for all. That is a debate that has been raging for years. But no one seems to be able to figure out how to pay for it. I think an interesting topic for discussion (a serious one, not arguing) is how can a country of 325 million people (US) provide free health care for all - when other countries have smaller populations: Germany, 84 million; UK 67 million; France 65 million; Italy 60 million; Spain 46 million; Poland 37 million; Romania 19 million; Netherlands 17 million, and Belgium 11 million. Consider that Americans have to pay for a massive military industrial complex on top of all the other obligations. When my late husband and I used to rent a condo in Florida for winters , he spent a lot of time in the hospital during his final illness. In the waiting rooms and in the hallways, I would talk to people who were in Florida to get medical treatment. Quite a few were from European countries. One person on my husband's floor was getting a heart operation and he was from England and, I believe, a Lord. I was also told by people they had to wait in line to see a doctor and they had to wait for surgeries. So they came to the U.S. for medical treatment. I agree health care should be provided for everyone, but considering only 44 percent of the U.S. population pays taxes, I would love to know just how much more the remaining taxpayers can be taxed. 325 million people is a lot of people to take care of. And so far Congress has yet to act on it. Hillary Clinton tried to get it done when she was First Lady and they practically ran her out of town. Discuss.

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    1. Ms. Clinton as First Lady refused to give up when congress defeated health care reform. Instead she worked with Republicans and Democrats to help create CHIP ( children health insurance program) which covers more than 8 million underprivileged children. It’s well known and agreed by both parties that without her, the program won’t exist today, and thousands of children would be denied medical treatment.
      This is a fact, no matter where you stand

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  40. Yes my profession is teacher not nurse/medical and a volunteer in various communities in the US and abroad through the years but I do very often have lots (and these days even more than usual) of robust discussions with those many nurses, including ICU nurses, soldiers, EMT’s, police, insurance agents, those helping abused youth, public servants in our immediate family/friends. Also while we clearly disagree about many things or even solutions, I can respect anyone’s decision to end discussion. It seems odd to me that those most adamant about ignoring my comments are the ones who replied to me first. I certainly would still welcome your response. I will just lastly say thank you to those who are serving/have served, in any role to help others but especially the military. Have a good day to others as well.
    Glo

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  41. @Glo, I am afraid of specific facts? You mean that I challenged some of Joann’s opinions about her immigration perceptions? Why do you feel compelled to attack me personally?
    You come on this blog lecturing everybody with your ridiculous denials about equality and specially systemic racism, perhaps our European contributors aren’t aware that the confederate flag symbol of slavery and treason has been displayed in court houses, city halls and many local gubernatorial institutions as recently as the last year , is that not systemic? That our own president just stated that is was a mistake to remove this flag from sports venues? Today in a cemetery in Texas a fence that separates whites from blacks was removed, local government came to realize that it was about time to acknowledge that segregation even in death is wrong. Our country leads the world in massive shootings, 5 year olds are killed in school , and we aren’t ashamed that our leadership won’t even attempt to do simple things to stop gun violence, simply because their pockets are being greased by the industry, I won’t ever be complicit, and I will continue to speak up, and not with violence as you insidiously suggest. This is a great country but the ones denying injustices aren’t contributing to its greatness.

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    1. Actually Sandra I was responding to your criticism of me “rationalizing”and telling people to ignore or “shun” me, not the immigration issue. People can read, ignore or respond to what I wrote, hopefully with less name calling and more info. I referenced Cherry to you because she has said she is someone in the trenches and I thought she would provide her insight/experience about if cardiac screening or info are more intensive in her clinic for pregnant women with higher risks of maternal mortality. Not lecturing, just willing to participate in responding or discussing issues as long as the moderator was willing to let it go beyond fashion.
      Glo

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  42. I think that changes in the country should be made by the elected representatives of the people in free elections - that is democracy - not by celebrities in the media and web conferences.
    Cherry Blossom said in a post above that only 44% of Americans pay taxes and therefore cannot afford insurance for everyone. This is a bad approach - and it needs to change. Relying on donations from wealthy people for medical facilities and schools is also not good. The huge amount of weapons among the people, the high crime rate - admit it - especially in minority neighborhoods - is also a huge problem.
    I don't like empty words, especially empty "blablabla" about equality, strength, leadership, ecology, especially from people educated in private schools (thanks Daddy), flying on private planes, living in large haciendas thanks to a bargain wedding with privileged man.
    The leader is the one who says: I have these proposals, I will promote them in the elections and when you elect me, I will implement them.

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  43. On the original topic of M&H. Like many of our children, they have chosen a path that appeals to them. If you do not like your job then it is hard to enjoy your life in general. No matter what you were born into, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness is everyone's right, particularly if they are not hurting anyone. If her grandson does not want the job then the queen does not have the right to carry his 'heart' in her purse.
    Many people have changed, countries, religions, and jobs for their spouse. Women are expected to do it willingly. Henry..not so much...but it is his choice.
    It seems, based on the leaks, the offer was all or nothing, and they chose nothing. The pandemic has scuttled their plans and may even make them have to rethink how to move forward, but there are many ways to make their living such as investing in movie projects, or producing educational and entertainment material. True, they may return to England eventually, but if there must be a certain sadness in cutting ribbons and waving to crowds if your heart is not in it.
    @Glo deep discussions can never replace 'boots on the ground' experience as Cherry relates. It may come as a shock, but $45M spread over 5 years is not a lot of money, when it includes rent, equipment, salaries, outreach etc. In some cases, the government by giving block grants to local communities to serve their population is out of the business of health care. This avoids salaries, pensions, infrastructure and all the other recurring expenses that go with it. The organizations have to live with that stated amount, that is why donations and exposure from celebrities are always welcome.
    Most of these celebrities as someone has said have grown up in small towns in average families. Celebrity is about marketing and being noticed, but behind the glitz and glamour they have to live normal lives like the rest of us. They have college degrees and other studies too and are entitled to an opinion and to 'pay it forward' if they wish. July

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    1. July - while I wholeheartedly agree someone in the trenches provides valuable perspective and is definitely worth listening to, and I sincerely mean that which is why I asked that question for Cherry in my comment to Sandra, I also think it is important to ask questions, challenge and consider what they have to say. The phrase “in the trenches...” for me goes hand in hand with “...to do what ?” I mean no disrespect by it I just want to make sure I understand or if it is helpful. I first became involved with volunteering with women and issues regarding pregnancy in college decades ago. I was an RA at a state/public school and one of my residents thought she had the flu. She and her roommate went to the infirmary, I was with them immediately after. She found out she was pregnant. In the midst of the shock and still being sick, both girls said the nurse told her how stupid she was for messing up her life and what a disappointment she would be to her parents who would be outraged by her situation, handed her a brochure to an abortion clinic and said to take care of it. She came back to the residence hall in tears, hysterical. Clearly not proper counseling or choice right. Whether she had a bad day or was just in the wrong profession, I reported the nurse and filed a complaint with the university, a difficult thing for me as a mere student (and her a health professional) and coming from a family of nurses/healthcare professionals but they actually encouraged me to do it. BTW the girl did call her parents and in this case they were not the horrible people the infirmary nurse (who had never even met them) made them out to be. They actually were amazingly supportive of their daughter and just as outraged by her treatment by this nurse. I do, as I said, speak often with those “in the trenches” and I certainly do not believe this example is indicative of all nurses (not by a long shot- thank heavens!) but it did make an impression.
      While $45 million can be gobbled up quickly the MMRC report as of 2018 was very thorough and of their top causes were rooted in chronic illness while their top recommendations of training, communication, greater focus on heart conditions topped the list. Although social and race were mentioned, they were significantly less a factor. Could they have missed it, were those who put the report together blinded by privilege (even though the committees were made up of many people from different states, different backgrounds, varying levels of medical expertise, and based on interviews of those in the trenches along with the medical files) maybe but it was just in 2018 and people can always look into that more. The point is it’s the same data many media and special interest groups reference but are running stories with an absolute different conclusion based on no new research, which gives me great pause.
      Thanks for the comment.
      Have a good one,
      Glo

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    2. @Glo, shifting away from the topic at hand with an anecdote that no self respecting professional should do to a young person in a stressful situation. But, contrast that with the previous generation where the young women were poorly educated about contraception, were put in homes, and the children sold/adopted to families by the CC. We are now discovering the psychological damage that was done to both parties. The 'healthy experiences' were not always so healthy. Teachers usually expect that both sides of an argument are discussed. A one sided submission is just a healthy dose of dogma.
      Being in the trenches applies to people who work in understaffed situations where most of the clients suffer from chronic illnesses like asthma, diabetes and HBP (which is becoming more prevalent at all levels of society) and more recently the ERs swamped by covid cases. That is where the money goes. Preventive care is cheaper than hospitalization when conditions become severe.
      I insist, just as you and I pay taxes and vote, M&H have a right to their ideas, choice of places to live, and occupational pursuits. There are a lot of people with a platform whose ideas are much more damaging than those of this couple, and they command a hug following. Sneering at people who have something to say because they are 'celebrities' is not commendable for an education professional. July

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    3. July- Maybe you are lumping me in with someone else, but I have made no comments about celebrities or sneering here. Regarding M & H I actually think if this more political activist content is their preferred role then it was wise to separate from the “Firm” of the Royal Family and have at it to the best of their abilities. I was also responding to you saying merely someone “in the trenches” are more important than deep discussions. I don’t think they are in competition, both are essential to me, especially if the person from the trenches is the professional we all would most expect. I tried giving a more personal than factual response about why merely being frontline is insufficient. Good point and I do agree with you about historical trends which were cruel and SO appreciate how much has changed over the years.
      Just to clarify that $45 million was only what the CDC spent for the 5 year analysis of US maternal mortality rates of which we have much more precise info since the way we record them was changed in 2003. The other health issues receive vastly more funding from all levels of gov’t as well as private funding.
      Have a good one.
      Glo

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  44. In short: Appearance: nice blue color of the blouse. Hair - no. Those artificial extensions are terrible. Speech - populist phrases.

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    1. And what have you done lately?

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  45. To Anon 9:43 - I work, I take care of my family and household. Now I have a short vacation - I am preparing for the second qualifying exam. My husband and I financially support a Catholic charity. We do hiking with the children and help the local shelter for dogs. I don't have the time or craving for populist celebrity bullshit. I like to design and sew models for myself and children, so I look for inspiration on fashion blogs. Enoug?

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  46. Anon@ 1:27. It doesn't look like you are learning much from your catholic endeavors. Your comment doesn't reflect the teachings of any church..

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  47. @Glo, you get lost on your own verbosity, constantly telling people how their points are anecdotal, but constantly bringing the experience of one individual. What does the behavior of an unprofessional nurse has any relevance with this conversation?
    You have an agenda about abortion and feel compelled to bring it up, but that is not what the conversation is about, is just a shiny object that you throw around because it fits you narrative. Also you have a very insidious way to portray the people on the trenches, and feel the need to discredit them, by pontificating and diverting the dialogue . You know, some of these people talking about certain deficiencies are just the voice of those who can’t. Your political agenda is irrelevant in this conversation.
    Isabel

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    1. Isabell you are right- I am far too verbose. I need to be more concise. I responded above to July about why I included the example I did and in my original post I clearly said it does not represent the majority of those “in the trenches“. I am not sure what communicated “pushing an agenda” to you having never mentioned abortion unless it was within the example from college. I offered support for my resident no matter what she chose. Talking with her parents gave her options to choose from and helped her to feel cared for, supported and equipped to make her own decision. I never said what the outcome was. I was not trying to direct conversation into another political debate about abortion.
      Have a good day,
      Glo

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  48. @Glo, you are right your “ bad nurse” doesn’t represent anybody but herself. The discussion was about MM speech which by the way it could have been given at any Girl Scout event, nothing revolutionary there, and by default some women on this blog dared to mention that there are many things to be done in regards to their wellbeing. You wasted no time to start on Planned Parenthood, abortion and a bunch of political stands.
    None of your points can erase the facts of many inequities that are still happening, and denying them doesn’t mean that you “ love” this country of ours more that the ones that dissent with your view..

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    1. Anon 5:36- My first comments, like so many others, were about women’s options in the US- which are powerful and numerous. In fact they were about education. I am glad so many women commented on their own thoughts about the content, we all have different ideas about those things. I agree with you about specific situations where inequality can occur to various individuals or people in specific situations, but it seems I disagree with you about the systemic nature of it. I also disagreed with some people in their responses to me. If you look back, I tried to do it with fact based info, not name calling or belittling them and only when someone responded to me as I am now.
      Have a good one,
      Glo

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    2. @Glo. It is evident that you crave the last word regardless of whether your position has been debunked or not. Back to the trenches, ..the solution of deep discussions is akin to Nero fiddling. The person who puts workable ideas on the table and the one who is actually doing the work are instrumental in alleviating any situation. Inequalities exist and they are systemic outside of the cocoon that some groups inhabit. The pandemic, and the death of Mr. Floyd has exposed some of them. There are reasons why states are ranked from 1-50 in several categories.
      With all that said, 9:17 below reduces a person offering encouragement to the next generation to the condition of their hair. ( The mission statement of the NAACP?)
      July
      July

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    3. July- So you go out of your way to respond to my reply to someone else but I am the one who wants the last word- ok. How about this- my last reply to you and then you come back with your personal theories about me all you want. I have been a teacher for over 20 years in both public and private situations, so here is an example with in the trenches experience and expert discussion/analysis. One area of the greatest documented inequality in the US is public education in urban areas. Generations of kids, mostly minority, have been forced into failed schools. However if that same student moves across the line from an urban district into a border district - from which they are not excluded due to any inherent trait since by law they live in this district- they receive a much better education and score in the double digits higher on achievement tests. This happens all the time in my husband’s (who has also been a teacher for over 20 years) district which borders the city. In fact sadly one of their biggest influx is people who use a relative’s or friend’s in-district info because they are desperate to give their child a better education. How about that same student does not move but rather gains entry into a neighborhood charter school, same improved education and higher achievement scores. Thomas Sowell’s latest study of Charter Schools shows that the same population, same neighborhood, Charter vs. local PS testing scores are over 50+ percentage points higher. Why does the NAACP oppose Charter Schools? Sadly they are not the only ones. Another urban district near ours was so corrupt and badly run the state actually took it over. Years later that district has had increased high school attendance and higher test scores. These are examples of why I say inequalities exist and can be in large numbers/ groups but are not systemic. The biggest issue is the badly run urban school policies.
      Have a good one and enjoy the last word- :)
      Glo

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    4. Glo regarding education inequalities- those urban districts almost always receive from their states (and spend) MORE money per student as well- so even there the inequality is not in spending. So often the cry is they lack funds but often Charters within those places spend as much as half the amount per student with better results.

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  49. That hair style need to go. Unprofessional . Appropriate for show biz only.

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    1. @9:17 How bizarre! This reeks of a lack of cultural exposure, and brings us back to the reasons for systemic racism. The future queen's hair during lockdown did not look much better, no call outs on that?

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  50. @ Glo, there you go again with your political stances... now you are charging against NAACP of course... no time waisted on your part to promote charter schools and throw shade to black institutions. Wow just wow!!!!

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    1. Anon 6:32- You must not be familiar with Mr. Thomas Sowell, try looking him up. He is a very intelligent, respected and leading AA economist and sociologist. It was his work I referenced about Charter schools and the NAACP standing against them is well documented. Before accusing me of some racist attitude you ought to be aware of what and about whom I was speaking. Also I responded with info about education policies - a very apolitical topic on which the vast majority of Americans have consensus. Besides if others can communicate about their thoughts on all topics, including politics or public policy, why are you trying to silence me with rudeness, when I wasn’t even responding to you.
      Have a good one,
      Glo

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  51. @6:32 forgive me for putting the NAACP on the table as fodder for Glo. July

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  52. Please ladies, stop responding to GLO...... I think she wants to run for office 😂😂😂😂😂😂

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  53. Glo, _thank you_ for your courtesy, reasonableness, clarity, objectivity, and patient perseverance. You are, and have remained, a class act and a voice of reason in spite of the insults, calumnies, and relentless childish snarkiness directed at you here. Imho, as long as there are people like you there is hope.

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    1. Wow Jane, thank you for taking the time to share your encouraging words😊.
      Glo

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  54. Good grief Jean Chantal, you write just like Glo... ummhhh!!!
    I

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